What can you make with floral foam, pantyhose and a box?…

Well frame fresh flowers of course. It’s a simple DIY that just involves a little pre-prep and gathering of ingredients, but in the end makes a great statement piece for an event

(image: Framed Flowers for a wedding at the Art Institute of Chicago - By K. La Designs in Chicago)

Frames can be versatile and used in a variety of places - not just hung on your wall with art inside. 

Frames can be versatile and used in a variety of places - not just hung on your wall with art inside. 

Masterpieces in Progress -

So this is frame wallpaper meant for coloring. I would have LOVED this as a child.

Someone please cover their child’s entire bedroom with this wallpaper as soon as possible. Best part is, as you grow up you can keep painting over the pictures and fill some of the frames with photos of you and your friends. Great way to give a kid ownership over their domain without permanently ruining your walls.

(Source: remodelista.com)

Bri Emery of DesignLoveFest posted a DIY mat tutorial on her blog recently and I thought it was too cute to pass up sharing. I am a big fan on white frames with white mats, but it was nice to see this tutorial spice up that combination a bit.

It’s very simple and the only advice I would add to her step by step DIY, is to try and keep all of your materials acid free. I know I talk about acid free materials all the time, but really it’s the difference between your hard work lasting 1 year versus 10.

Find acid free decorative paper at almost any craft or art store and acid free PVA glue will last a long time without yellowing. And if you can afford it, use UV protective glass as well. 

Pablo the Object Frame - display and frame your favorite objects with the flip of a shelf.
I think this would be particularly cute in a kitchen - one day it can display a bowl of fruit and the next it could hold the cookbook you are using to make dinner.
You can get one at CharlesandMarie.com

Pablo the Object Frame - display and frame your favorite objects with the flip of a shelf.

I think this would be particularly cute in a kitchen - one day it can display a bowl of fruit and the next it could hold the cookbook you are using to make dinner.

You can get one at CharlesandMarie.com

One of my favorite uses for frames, is as a hiding place. A piece of framed art is the perfect distraction for an ugly thermostat, electrical box or even a secret safe.

Take any framed art you have (preferably in a wood frame) and attach hinges to one side of the frame. You may have to use a shadow box frame if you are hiding an object that sticks out of the wall some. Screw the hinges into the wall and you have yourself a super-secret hiding method. 

Empty Frame Trend

There’s been a trend lately (you may have seen it on Pinterest or your favorite design blogs) where people are hanging empty frames in clusters on their wall. I think it’s a great way to add interest to an empty space, especially if you don’t have any artwork for that space or can’t afford any artwork for the space. 

Here’s my advice for executing this look:

Don’t get your frames at a frame shop - ok, let me clarify before the secret framer mob comes to get me. Don’t get CUSTOM frames from a frame shop. Many framers keep wrong size, overstock or discontinued moulding frames around for a much better price. Since you don’t have any artwork to fit inside, you don’t have to be picky with size, so take advantage of discount frames. Also, thrift stores are a great place to find cheap frames - usually with bad artwork inside, but you can always take that out.

Choose a Color Scheme - They don’t have to be the same color - in fact I like it better when they’re not - but keeping all the frames within a few shades of each other will help the mismatched shapes and profiles look more cohesive. I helped a friend decorate a hallway with some frames we bought at thrift stores. We chose 3 paint colors and kept the silver frames as they were. The result was a nice mix of frames in the same color family.

Plan out your arrangement - As seen in the 'How to hang a multi-frame wall' post, it’s easy to plan out your frame arrangement before taking to your wall with a hammer and nail. Think about the overall shape of the wall, ceiling height, lighting and sconce placement and furniture when arranging. 

Framed Bookshelves

A cute idea for a free form book case, but it would be even better if the shelf part was set into the wall.

I also think this could be an interesting use of space along a stairway or in a narrow hall (again, if you set the shelf part into the wall)

(Source: changeofsceneries.blogspot.com.au)

Non-frame Framing: When is it okay not to frame and what are the alternatives?

Sometimes framing something properly is simply out of the budget and other times it just doesn’t seem worth it for what you’re trying to display. If you’re not too worried about preserving the piece or you just need a short-term display option, here are some cheaper alternatives to the traditional frame.

  • Display Clips - You can use these with any work on paper with or without a mat. Buying a custom cut mat alone will cost a fraction of what a whole frame will cost. If you’re not worried about moisture damage or other damage (like splatters in a kitchen) then simple display clips are a good alternative for small works.
  • Corner Frame Clips - these clips are often referred to as frameless frames because they essentially contain everything a traditional frame would contain (glazing, mat board, backing foam core) without the frame. They have metal claws that clip around either side of each corner of the work. These are a great option for small works that wont be exposed to moisture.
  • Tape Frame - this is a temporary solution that has the appearance of a thin simple frame at a fraction of the cost. Used on small things with acid free materials, it’s a pretty good short-term solution for a tight budget. (A ‘how-to’ coming in a couple weeks…)
  • Dry Mounting - It’s a process of adhering prints, posters or photographs to foam core, MDF or Gatorboard. MDF and Gatorboard are durable enough to be hung without a frame. Foam core is still susceptible to bending and denting and should eventually be protected for long-term hanging. This process is usually not reversible though, so make sure you want it to be attached for good if you go this route.
I think this frame wallpaper from Swedish designer Lisa Bengtsson is such a good idea. Perfect for a small room like a half-bath, office nook or kids bedroom. Perfect place to hang snap shots and photo booth pictures that you don’t want to frame.
Her wallpapers are available at these retailers.

I think this frame wallpaper from Swedish designer Lisa Bengtsson is such a good idea. Perfect for a small room like a half-bath, office nook or kids bedroom. Perfect place to hang snap shots and photo booth pictures that you don’t want to frame.

Her wallpapers are available at these retailers.