Herb, Dorothy, their 1 bedroom NYC apartment and their priceless art collection…
http://mentalfloss.com/article/48844/how-working-class-couple-amassed-priceless-art-collection
http://herbanddorothy.com/

Herb, Dorothy, their 1 bedroom NYC apartment and their priceless art collection…

http://mentalfloss.com/article/48844/how-working-class-couple-amassed-priceless-art-collection

http://herbanddorothy.com/

arpeggia:

Morgan Richard Murphey - Untitled, 2012, acrylic on canvas, ratchet clamp, 63” x 46”

arpeggia:

Morgan Richard Murphey - Untitled, 2012, acrylic on canvas, ratchet clamp, 63” x 46”

(via artwasherestill)

Pineapple, Tab. IVfrom Nürnbergische HesperidesJ.A. Endter Sohn und Erben, Nuremberg: 1708 and 1714Hand-colored engravings
Pineapple plant on a sturdy green stalk, the fruit cut in half to reveal ripe golden fruit. The background is a maritime view with many tall ships in a harbor and a town on the opposite shore. This is a rarely encountered double-size folding plate from Nürnbergische Hesperides.
The prints follow a distinctive artistic format in which the fruit or flowers are displayed in monumental scale in bird’s-eye views above landscapes of the formal gardens, palazzos and country houses where they were grown.  Fruits are generally shown flying in the sky, though sometimes other compositions are employed, such as oversized plants towering over Lilliputian landscapes.  A floating ribbon wrapped around each specimen bears its name.  

Pineapple, Tab. IV
from Nürnbergische Hesperides
J.A. Endter Sohn und Erben, Nuremberg: 1708 and 1714
Hand-colored engravings

Pineapple plant on a sturdy green stalk, the fruit cut in half to reveal ripe golden fruit. The background is a maritime view with many tall ships in a harbor and a town on the opposite shore. This is a rarely encountered double-size folding plate from Nürnbergische Hesperides.

The prints follow a distinctive artistic format in which the fruit or flowers are displayed in monumental scale in bird’s-eye views above landscapes of the formal gardens, palazzos and country houses where they were grown.  Fruits are generally shown flying in the sky, though sometimes other compositions are employed, such as oversized plants towering over Lilliputian landscapes.  A floating ribbon wrapped around each specimen bears its name.  

art21:

"A lot of my work has been about the unexpected—that kind of wanting to be the heroine and yet wanting to kill the heroine at the same time. That kind of dilemma—that push and pull—is the underlying turbulence that I bring to each of the pieces that I make."
—Kara Walker

Happy birthday today (November 26) to artist Kara Walker. Seen here is the artist at work in her New York studio in 2002, as featured in the Season 2 Stories episode from Art21’s Art in the Twenty-First Century series.

WATCH: Kara Walker in Stories [available in the U.S only] | Additional videos

IMAGES: Production stills from the Art in the Twenty-First Century Season 2 episode, Stories, 2003. © Art21, Inc. 2003.

(via deyoungmuseum)

criminalwisdom:

Vast, ‘$1.4-billion’ stash of art thought destroyed in Nazi Germany found in Munich apartment»

A random background check designed to expose money-launderers travelling to Switzerland has uncovered a treasure trove of modern art thought to have been destroyed in Nazi Germany.
Customs officials seized the haul of 1,500 works — including masterpieces by Henri Matisse, Pablo Picasso, Pierre-Auguste Renoir and Marc Chagall — from the Munich apartment of an elderly man suspected of hiding his wealth in Swiss banks.
The paintings were found stacked in the apartment of Cornelius Gurlitt, 80, whose father, a prominent Munich art dealer, is believed to have acquired them during the 1930s and 1940s.
"From floor to ceiling, from bedroom to bathroom, were piles and piles of old food in tins and old noodles. Behind it all were these pictures worth tens, hundreds of millions of euros.” (Photo: AFP/Getty Images)

(Source: nationalpost)

criminalwisdom:

Vast, ‘$1.4-billion’ stash of art thought destroyed in Nazi Germany found in Munich apartment»

A random background check designed to expose money-launderers travelling to Switzerland has uncovered a treasure trove of modern art thought to have been destroyed in Nazi Germany.

Customs officials seized the haul of 1,500 works — including masterpieces by Henri Matisse, Pablo Picasso, Pierre-Auguste Renoir and Marc Chagall — from the Munich apartment of an elderly man suspected of hiding his wealth in Swiss banks.

The paintings were found stacked in the apartment of Cornelius Gurlitt, 80, whose father, a prominent Munich art dealer, is believed to have acquired them during the 1930s and 1940s.

"From floor to ceiling, from bedroom to bathroom, were piles and piles of old food in tins and old noodles. Behind it all were these pictures worth tens, hundreds of millions of euros.” (Photo: AFP/Getty Images)

(Source: nationalpost)

(via darksilenceinsuburbia)

unusualstroll:

by David Hocney // “a bigger splash” 

unusualstroll:

by David Hocney // “a bigger splash” 

artlog:

"Young photographers like Clarissa Bonet remind us that no matter the fashion, the medium or the latest app, engaging work is ultimately all about the light." Read more: http://www.artlog.com/2013/1067

artlog:

"Young photographers like Clarissa Bonet remind us that no matter the fashion, the medium or the latest app, engaging work is ultimately all about the light." Read more: http://www.artlog.com/2013/1067

gallerydaily:

Bridget Riley, Stripes, Sketches 1964. Working in her Studio, 1960s. © Bridget Riley. All rights reserved

(Source: sunspel.com)

A creative man with a vision for building from trash…

They are the creations of Dan Phillips, 64, who has had an astonishingly varied life, working as an intelligence officer in the Army, a college dance instructor, an antiques dealer and a syndicated cryptogram puzzle maker. About 12 years ago, Mr. Phillips began his latest career: building low-income housing out of trash.

To him, almost anything discarded and durable is potential building material. Standing in one of his houses and pointing to a colorful, zigzag-patterned ceiling he made out of thousands of picture frame corners, Mr. Phillips said, “A frame shop was getting rid of old samples, and I was there waiting.”

- The New York Times

sneakykittyr asked: What is naked art

I’m glad you asked… this is from an early post (June 7, 2012):

Naked Art is art that needs to be clothed. It’s raw, it’s open, it’s unfinished and to leave it that way just seems indecent. Enter: the Framer. Framers are to artwork what a stylist is to a celebrity. Framers take over where the artist has left off. We are the finishers, the polishers, we add the accent jewelry before you’re thrust onto the red carpet for the world to see (and judge). 

That’s not to say that all unframed art is Naked. Hence the all too different synonym, Nude. Nude art is fully aware of it’s state of undress. It’s proud, it’s rebellious, it’s happy as it is. It’s the 2 year old child defiantly taking their clothes off in the middle of a crowded mall, because they can. And because they just don’t like their clothes. 

To be honest though, this idea did not come from me. Not even remotely. I read a poem in high school that stuck:

The Naked and the Nude
Robert Graves 

For me, the naked and the nude
(By lexicographers construed
As synonyms that should express
The same deficiency of dress
Or shelter) stand as wide apart
As love from lies, or truth from art.

Lovers without reproach will gaze
On bodies naked and ablaze;
The Hippocratic eye will see
In nakedness, anatomy;
And naked shines the Goddess when
She mounts her lion among men.

The nude are bold, the nude are sly
To hold each treasonable eye.
While draping by a showman’s trick
Their dishabille in rhetoric,
They grin a mock-religious grin
Of scorn at those of naked skin.

The naked, therefore, who compete
Against the nude may know defeat;
Yet when they both together tread
The briary pastures of the dead,
By Gorgons with long whips pursued,
How naked go the sometime nude!

I love it because I think it applies to so many people in so many situations. A label and an attitude can so easily change two supposedly identical things. 

In my studio I produce work without thinking too much about it’s final presentation. I’ve made things that are ‘naked’ and things that are ‘nude.’  But as a framer I enter the picture (no pun intended) at the final stages. I’m always trying to find the finishing touch. And it’s only on a rare occasion I will concede that there is no appropriate framing solution.